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Chris Anderson – The Next Industrial Revolution

Do you think down the road we might have 3D shops on every corner? If there comes a point where we can access everything we need on demand, do you think that could potentially change our living habits or even decentralize the importance of cities?

I wouldn’t go that far. Today, there are copy centers. There are printers on every desktop, and copy centers, not on every corner, but there are a lot of Kinkos around. If you’re reading the printed New York Times, you’re probably not printing it out yourself. If you’re reading a book, you’re probably not printing it out yourself. Personal printing didn’t really change the manufacturing of printed media. It could have. We do have those tools. It just turns out, the physical form didn’t want to be changed that much. We switched through the Web to the digital form, which didn’t require any manufacturing at all.

If you’re reading the printed New York Times, you’re probably not printing it out yourself. If you’re reading a book, you’re probably not printing it out yourself…By the same token, I wouldn’t expect that China would be hollowed out and replaced with corner micro-manufacturing centers.

By the same token, I wouldn’t expect that China would be hollowed out and replaced with corner micro-manufacturing centers. I think it is very easy to imagine that just as your computer has multifunction capability— a printer, a scanner, and a fax machine—you could add a 3D printer function to your multifunction center, and you could print plastic as well as paper.

I still don’t necessarily think you’re going to stop going to Wal-Mart. There are real advantages to mass production, for example, cost and quality. There are also things 3D printers can’t do and maybe will never be able to do in- volving material science and texture. It’s hard enough to have 3 or 4 different ink cartridges. Imagine how many chemical cartridges you’d need to print something as simple as textured rubberized vinyl. Maybe someday we’ll have matter compilers, and they’ll begin binding matter on the atomic level, self-assembling into stuff, but I don’t know how we get there.

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Chris Anderson – CEO of 3D Robotics, formerly Editor of Wired

I’m the CEO of 3D Robotics and founder of DIY Drones. From 2001 through 2012 I was the Editor in Chief of WiredMagazine. Before Wired I was with The Economist for seven years in London, Hong Kong and New York in various positions, ranging from Technology Editor to US Business Editor.

I’m the author of the New York Times bestselling books The Long Tail and Free as well as the new Makers: The New Industrial Revolution.

Awards include: Editor of the Year by Ad Age (2005). Named to the “Time 100,” the newsmagazine’s list of the 100 most influential people in the world (2007). Loeb Award for Business Book of the Year (2007). Wired named Magazine of the Decade by AdWeek for my tenure (2009). Time Magazine’s Tech 40 — The Most Influential Minds In Technolgy (2013).

I founded GeekDad, BookTour and a few other companies now lost in the mists of time.

My background is in science, starting with studying physics and doing research at Los Alamos and culminating in six years at the two leading scientific journals, Nature andScience.

In my misspent youth (more of my twenties than I should admit) I was a bit player in the DC punk scene and amusingly, a band called REM. You can read more about that here.

I live in Berkeley, California with my wife and five children.

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